Comment

So why are we dancing?

In October 1942 an American bomber crashed on Porlock Marsh with the loss of 11 lives. One airman survived. So why are we dancing?

On the eve of the first performance, I want to say something about this. For dancing, think movement. Movement is a great communicator, it gets rid of the need for words. If I kick with aggression, it's likely you will experience a physical reaction. You know what it's like to kick and be kicked. If Liberator does its job properly, with movement all around, you'll be able to feel things that belong to the time of the crash.

Comment

Comment

Behind the scenes...

Part of the rationale of Liberator is to give talented youngsters exposure to a professional creative project... like Izzy Bruce from Timberscombe First School, aged 9, who is working with us a Production Assistant. It's a role that requires focus and maturity. She's there to make sure the performers remain safe, props are where they should be, routes in the wood from one scene to another are viable etc... She doesn't get the excitement of having a costume made for her or taking a bow in front of an audience. That said, I think she's enjoying using our long range walkie talkies! Well done Izzy, you're doing great!

Comment

Comment

Those who witnessed the Liberator crash on Porlock Marsh in October 1942...

As part of my research for the project, I've been talking to Porlock residents who remember the crash.  Here's a link to a short interview with Noah Perkins, aged 11 at the time.  It's an incredible snapshot... he was on the roof of his father's garage in Porlock Weir when he saw the plane get into difficulty.

It's part of the beauty of making work about real events... individual stories spring to life.  A huge thank you to Noah and his wife, both of whom will be attending the Marsh performance in September. 

Comment

Comment

Tasty items!

We're really pleased to welcome Aden Watkins to the Liberator team. I've long known it's important to offer an audience lovingly prepared refreshments after a performance, especially when everyone's been walking for a while. That's where Aden comes in... he's going to be creating site-specific snacks for each performance. I also want the world to know what a great cook he is. Honestly, I felt quite embarrassed compelled to eat non-stop at one of his son's birthday parties - forget the celebrations, all I could think about was the food!

So for the price of a £5/£3 ticket you get a great show and great grub!

Comment

Comment

Duets

As confidence between the dancers grows, it's becoming increasing possible to expand the limits of contact duets.  I'm not sure who needs to be more fearless...  Lenny (aged 6), Ernie (aged 8) or Duncan (aged forever young).

Comment

Comment

Nice weather for dancing!

As the weather gets warmer, particularly as humidity levels increase, it's a good time for dancers.  The muscles soften and our bodies feel elastic... it's also shirts off for some.

As a result, everyone seemed to find it easy to take off!

Comment

Comment

First costume fitting...

We all sat back with a nice cup of tea and biscuits to watch Ruth get to work.  With a few pins and snips she quickly brings cloth to life.  

NEWSFLASH!  The soft t-shirts and knee high socks are a hit with the boys and Raffy has instructed Ruth how to make a special pouch for her RAF badge.

Comment